Device safety

Device safety

It’s a common sight to see people walking around connected to the Internet through their mobile phones. It also means that children are getting younger when they gain access to their own device. It can be tricky for parents to keep a close eye and protect their children on a daily basis. Get Safe Online’s CEO Tony Neate provided us with some handy advice to help give you peace of mind when your child is out and about.

Setting up their devices

As on your computer, parental controls are simple to set up, and can either be done through the Internet provider or the mobile network. Neate highlights “there are a large number of different brands and types of parental control software available for both computers and mobile devices.” The software allows you to monitor online activity, set timers and even prevent in-app purchases.

Protection out and about

You can’t monitor everything your child is doing when they’re out of the house, so it’s crucial to help them understand what is safe and appropriate to view or do online. It’s also important to make sure they come to you when they see something inappropriate. Encourage them to use ‘Friendly WiFi’ when they’re out; a scheme that helps children and adults identify a secure Internet connection in public places. It protects children by filtering inappropriate content, and helps prevent devices being hacked or having personal information stolen. Neate also recommends that you “make sure your child is aware of the importance in keeping phones and other devices secure and well-hidden,” to stop them being lost or stolen.

Safe gaming

Gaming consoles are a great way for children to play games and connect with friends online, but it’s also a haven for inappropriate content and online bullying. Again, it’s important to discuss with your children what’s appropriate when playing online and talking to other people. Neate tells us to make use of the filters accessible through the parental controls. This will help prevent any in-game purchases without your consent, and stop strangers trying to contact your child. Neate also suggests checking “age ratings of games to ensure your child isn’t accessing inappropriate content.”

 

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