We use cookies to give you the best possible online experience. If you continue, we’ll assume you are happy for your web browser to receive all cookies from our website. See our cookie policy for more information on cookies and how to manage them.

Close

My workplace

5 steps towards the retirement you want

 

Do your future self a favour and follow our top tips…

Many of us have got things in mind we’d like to do when we retire – whether it’s travelling the world or simply doing more of what you love. But how can you save enough for a decent retirement… without having to give up what makes life good today? 

Here are five simple steps you can take that could boost your chances of getting the retirement you want:

1. Get familiar with your workplace pension

While pensions aren’t the only way of saving for retirement, they’re built for the job – and come with benefits you won’t find elsewhere.

With a workplace pension there's a good chance your employer will help you save. And as an added bonus, the government gives you tax relief on money you pay in, meaning more money is invested. 

How the taxman helps you save for retirement

  • For every 80p paid into your pension, the taxman adds 20p in tax relief, meaning more money is invested. This means you end up with £1 in your pension pot.

This is how tax relief works for basic rate tax payers. If you pay tax at more than the basic rate you may be able to claim even more tax relief through your self-assessment tax return. This information is based our understanding of 2019/20 tax rules. Tax benefits are subject to change, interpretation and depend on individuals' circumstance. 

2. Make the most of any tops up from your boss

If your employer tops up your pension plan, they might chip in a bit more if you do too. Some employers will up their contributions if you increase your payments too (usually up to a limit). So – if you can afford to – it makes sense to make the most of it. Yes, it isn’t cash going into your pocket right now, but its money going towards your future nonetheless.

3. Be an early bird

Early on in your career is when it’s easiest to make a big difference to your pension pot – even through small changes.

The sooner you pay into a pension, the sooner you’ll start receiving tax relief from the government – and any contributions your employer adds. Your pension pot also will have longer to potentially grow in value. And if you put things off, you’ll probably have to pay in a greater proportion of your salary just to achieve the same result.

4. Review your investment choices

The money you pay into your pension is invested. And exactly where it’s invested can make a huge difference, so it’s worth finding out where your money is going. The better your investments perform after charges, the bigger your pension pot will be. Although, don't forget that the value of investments can go down as well as up - you could get back less than has been invested.

With many pension schemes you can change your investment choices free of charge. Don’t like where your money’s invested now? You can change it. Just remember that if you do switch funds, it’s important to pick ones that suit your circumstances and attitude to risk. If you’re unsure what to do, you may want to speak to a financial adviser.

5. Stay on top of things

One of the best ways of keeping your plans on track is to keep an eye on your pension. That way, you can check whether your investments are performing OK, and that you’re not paying too much in charges. These days, you can often manage your pension online, making all of this really easy to do.

When you’re young and concentrating on your career, it can be tough to think about the future. But if you want to enjoy yourself later in life, too, taking steps like these is a great way to start.

This article is not intended to give advice or a personal recommendation. If you’d like a personalised recommendation based on your circumstances, you should seek financial advice. 

Get expert advice

It is advisable to explore all your advice options by checking out if your employer has set up an advice service for you or you may wish to contact a financial adviser, if you have one. 

Alternatively, we offer a personal financial advice service – Aviva Financial Advice. There’s no charge for your first meeting with our advisers and no obligation to carry on with the service if you feel it’s not right for you. Aviva advisers can only advise on the products and services offered by Aviva. If you require independent advice, we can put you in touch with one of our carefully-selected financial advice partners.

If you would like to find out more about this service please call our financial advice support team on 0800 068 7360, or book a call from our website www.aviva.co.uk/advice. A financial adviser may charge for their services. 

SS01052 04/2019

Cut back and save

Feel you can't afford to save? See how much those 'little extras' cost you and what you could be saving.

Get expert advice on your plans

A financial adviser can help you make sure your money’s on track to achieve your financial goals

Tracing lost pensions

It's easy to lose track of old pensions. Start by contacting your previous employer or contact the Pensions Tracing Service.

Back to top