Brexit

Frequently asked questions

Do I need a Green card?

If you’re planning to drive your vehicle in the EU & EEA countries, Serbia, Switzerland and Andorra. You’ll need to contact us two weeks before you plan to travel so we can decide whether we need to issue you with a Green Card.

You’ll need a Green Card if you’re driving any vehicle in the EU to prove you have the insurance you need. It doesn’t matter what level of motor cover you have, including if your policy has a foreign use extension.

You’ll also need a Green Card when driving from Northern Ireland to the Republic of Ireland.

If you’re travelling with a trailer, you’ll need to register any commercial trailer weighing over 750kg before towing them abroad. All trailers (personal and commercial) weighing over 3,500kg must be registered. You’ll also need to get a Green Card for separately registered trailers.


I’m an Aviva customer. Do I need to do anything for Brexit?

If you bought insurance from us in the UK and are currently – and will continue to be – permanently resident in the UK, your cover will not be affected and will remain valid. As the majority of our customers are resident in the UK, most policies won’t be affected by what happens at the end of the transition period.

If you no longer live in the UK or you’re thinking of leaving the UK in the near future, your policies may be affected.

We’re monitoring developments and speaking with regulators to minimise any challenges that may come up. We’ll always aim to provide the service you expect.

We’ll update our website with more information, so you should keep checking back here as more details are announced.

You should take independent financial advice if you’re unsure as to whether you need to take any action.


I bought a policy from Aviva UK, even though I am permanently resident in an EEA country. What’s the impact of the UK’s exit from the EU on my policy?

Some of our customers bought their policy from us while permanently resident in an EEA country, or have risks (like insured homes or premises) in EEA countries. We’ve transferred most of these policies to our business in Ireland.

If this affects you, we’ll already have written to you and there’ll be no change to the way your policy works, the way you contact us, or the level of service you receive.

If you’d like more information, you’ll find answers to specific questions about the transfer of these policies here.


Will my European Health Insurance Card (EHIC) still be valid after Brexit?

If you already hold a UK-issued EHIC, this will be valid until the expiry date.

Once your EHIC has expired, you’ll be able to replace it with a Global Health insurance Card (GHIC) which gives you access to free or reduced cost state-provided healthcare if you need medical treatment during a temporary visit to the EU.

Just so you know, there are a few groups of individuals who still need to apply for a new EHIC. Please refer to NHS guidance for more information..

With the GHIC, you can access treatment at the same cost that residents in that country pay. But it’s important to remember that some country’s state healthcare isn’t free so you may need to pay towards your treatment. If you have valid travel insurance, you may be able to claim back this cost from your insurer.

Having a valid EHIC/GHIC doesn’t affect the cover you get through your travel insurance.

To apply for a GHIC, you should visit the NHS website and search for GHIC.

A GHIC is free so don’t trust unofficial websites which charge you to apply for one.


How do I get a Green Card?

If you still need a Green Card, you can apply for one here or call us on 0345 030 7077. We recommend you apply two weeks before you’re due to travel to make sure it can be posted and delivered to you in time.


Is Aviva strong enough to withstand market movements following the UK’s exit from the EU?

We’re financially strong, with a very significant capital surplus of approximately £12 billion announced at our 2020 half-year results.

Because of our strong financial position and the diversity of the funds we invest in, we’re confident that we’ll be able to meet our commitment to you.


How will the UK’s exit from the EU affect my pension or investments?

We can’t predict what impact, if any, a future deal will have on financial markets.

Your policy offers a range of different funds you can invest in and you can track the performance of your funds regularly by logging onto MyAviva. You can also call us using the number on your most recent statement.

You should take financial advice before making any decision relating to your particular investments with us.

We’re monitoring developments and speaking with regulators to minimise any challenges that may come up. We’ll always aim to provide the service you expect. We’ll update our website with more information, so you should keep checking back here as more details are announced.


Will you be able to make a payment to me overseas?

Aviva makes international payments into non-UK bank accounts. Currently we believe that we’ll continue to be able to do this for cross-border payments post-Brexit. It’s possible that new transaction charges may be levied on these, both for Aviva and for our customers; however, this is still uncertain.

Additionally, following the outcome of Brexit negotiations, the approach taken by EU/EEA regulators may affect the way in which any payments from the UK into non-UK bank accounts may be regulated or taxed by the country in which the recipient is based.

We don’t yet know what the approach of these regulators or tax authorities will be. We’re continuing to monitor political developments and are engaging with our regulators, so we can minimise any regulatory or operational difficulties that might arise. We’ll always aim to provide the service our customers expect, whatever the Brexit outcome may be.


Can I still travel to the EU?

Yes, as long as you have the right documents.

Check what passports, visas and documents you may need – this may have changed. You should check the current advice from the Foreign & Commonwealth Office or the country you’re planning on travelling to.

If you’re driving your car abroad, you may need a Green Card and an international driving permit (see the motor insurance section on this page for more information). You won’t be covered if you need to claim because you haven’t got the necessary documents when leaving the UK.


Will my insurance cover me for travel delays and cancellations due to Brexit?

Yes, in some cases.

If you can’t fly because of Brexit (remember that the Government expects flights will carry on as normal), then you should speak to your airline about getting a refund. If your policy covers airspace closure, you can claim, and we’ll help you cover the costs of travel arrangements or accommodation. This cover might be an optional addition to your policy.

You won’t be covered if you need to claim because you haven’t got the necessary documents when leaving the UK.

Your insurance will still cover you for flight delays, but you won’t be covered if you miss your flight because there were delays checking in or getting through security. So you‘ll need to make sure you allow time for any possible delays.


Do I need to buy any insurance to replace the European Health Insurance Card (EHIC)?

You should consider buying travel insurance for a number of reasons. Medical costs are likely to be the main reason, even if you have a valid EHIC or GHIC. As long as your travel insurance claim is accepted, we’ll cover your emergency medical costs.

Even though the EHIC/GHIC may cover some or all emergency treatment costs, it won’t cover the cost of bringing you back to the UK for medical reasons.

If you do decide to buy travel insurance, it’s important that you understand your cover. If you have pre-existing medical conditions you should make sure that your medical declaration is up to date. As always, check your policy booklet and find out what you need to disclose. We’ll screen your medical conditions and confirm if they can be covered.


Will there be any changes to my travel insurance after Brexit?

No, we’re not currently planning to make any changes due to Brexit.


I’m driving abroad beyond the borders of the EU – do I need a Green Card?

Your motor insurance with us doesn’t go beyond the following countries: 

EU Countries: Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Republic of Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain & Sweden

EEA countries not in the EU: Iceland, Liechtenstein and Norway

Other countries where you don’t need a Green Card during the transition period: Andorra, Serbia and Switzerland

If you’re planning to drive your vehicle in any of the below countries, call us on 0345 030 8651 so we can check what you’ll need to be covered:

  • Bosnia & Herzegovina
  • Israel
  • Morocco 
  • Montenegro
  • Tunisia
  • Turkey.

Where can I get more information on driving in the EU after the UK’s exit from the EU?

The Government’s published guidance on driving in the EU after the UK’s exit from the European Union at www.gov.uk/driving-abroad

We’re monitoring developments and speaking with regulators to minimise any challenges that may come up. We’ll always aim to provide the service you expect. We’ll update our website with more information, so you should keep checking back here as more details are announced.


What's a Green Card?

A Green Card is issued by the driver’s insurer. It acts as evidence that the driver has the minimum legal cover needed for the country they’re visiting whilst driving outside the UK. The Green Card is a physical document which is printed on green paper – it isn’t valid in an electronic format.


I’m travelling to the EU, will my car insurance still be valid?

Under UK law, your motor insurance must give you the legal minimum cover needed when driving in the EU.

Your policy will still cover you to drive in the EU, but you’ll currently need a Green Card.

For some countries, you might also need an International Driving Permit (IDP) when you’re asked to show driving documents.


I used to live and work in the UK and during this period my pension fund was created. I'm now resident in the EU. What will happen to my pension?

Some customers bought their policy in the UK and have now permanently relocated or may, in the future, permanently relocate to a different country within the European Union (EU) / European Economic Area (EEA). The treatment of these policies after 31 December 2020 will depend on the approach taken by the authorities in each EU/EEA country. Unfortunately, we don’t have an official decision on this yet. 

If you’re resident in France, there may be certain things we won’t be able to do in relation to your pension such as voluntary lump sum payments. Read the latest on the impact to pension policies for French residents.

You should keep checking back here as more details are announced. We’re monitoring developments and speaking with regulators to minimise any challenges that may come up. We’ll always aim to provide the service you expect.

You should take independent financial advice if you’re unsure about what to do. 


I’m a UK citizen resident in an EU/EEA country. What will happen to my State Pension after the UK exits the EU?

The Government looks after your State Pension. 

The Government has said there won’t be any changes before 1 January 2021 to the rules on claiming UK benefits and State Pension in the EEA or Switzerland as a result of the UK leaving the EU. 

The Government is looking to keep certain arrangements with the EU - but the rules depend on what's agreed during negotiations and may change.

This includes:

  • counting future social security contributions in the EEA and Switzerland towards meeting UK State Pension qualifying conditions
  • getting your UK State Pension uprated every year in the EEA and Switzerland

We’ll update our website with more information, so you should keep checking back here as more details are announced. 

For the latest information on the State Pension, see the Money Advice Service website.


Will I still be able to auto-enrol EU nationals into my Aviva workplace pension scheme?

Yes. You’ll still need to automatically enrol any workers who usually work for you in the UK. Current regulations allow anyone who is a UK resident to join a pension scheme – there are no regulations based on nationality.


Will there be any change to the way I can manage my life, critical illness or income protection insurance policies after the UK leaves the EU?

Currently we allow cover to continue where a customer relocates temporarily or permanently to a different country within the EU/EEA during the term of their policy. However, there may be some restrictions on changing your existing policies.

We’re monitoring developments and speaking with regulators to minimise any challenges that may come up. We’ll always aim to provide the service you expect.

In all EU territories, there’ll be restrictions on increasing the level and length of your cover. In addition, you won’t be able to renew policies or receive any further cover.

We’re aware that not all our policy options will still be available for customers in France. For example, we expect that you won’t be able to increase your cover or continue with renewable premiums. You may not be able to lower the level or length of your cover either. We’ll write to you if this impacts you.

You should take independent financial advice if you’re unsure about what to do.


What happens if I'm a customer resident in one of the EEA countries listed and making and/or receiving payments through a UK bank account?

If you’re a customer in any of the below EEA countries, you should contact your UK bank to see if they’re planning to make changes to your UK bank account due to the UK leaving the EU at the end of 2020. Your UK bank may have already been in contact with you.

You’ll need to let us know if the bank details we hold have changed so that we can carry on making/receiving payments for your policies.

EEA countries: Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain and Sweden. Also, Switzerland.


Will I need a Green Card to drive in the EU after Brexit?

Whilst we’ve agreed a post-Brexit trade deal with the EU, you’ll still need a Green Card when driving to EEA countries as well as Andorra, Serbia and Switzerland. This is because we’re currently still outside the Green Card free circulation area.


Do I need a Green Card when driving from Northern Ireland to the Republic of Ireland?

Yes, you’ll currently need a Green Card to travel from Northern Ireland to the Republic of Ireland.


Is my driving licence still valid in the EU?

Yes. But if you have a paper driving licence or a driving licence issued in Jersey, Guernsey or the Isle of Man, you may need an International Driving Permit (IDP).

This depends on where you’re going so check the rules of the country you’re travelling to.


Can you also provide me with an International Driving Permit (IDP)?

The government provides IDPs and you should be able to get one from the Post Office. We won’t be able to issue them to our customers.

FAQs

Find the answers to some of the most frequently asked questions on car, home, health, life and travel insurance cover, pensions, investments, the Aviva Drive app and Brexit.